Angelology Monday, May 30 2011 

Hi Readers,

One word: Amazing!! Danielle Trussoni’s Angelology is a masterpiece and one of the best novels ever written. Never before have I been pulled into a book this way, and even better, you do not see the end coming. There might be small spoilers below…

One of the original branches of theology, angelology is achieved in the person of the angelologist, whose expertise includes both the theoretical study of angelic systems and their prophetic execution through human history.

The following is a huge passage, but I love all the names Trussoni mentions:

If we were in Paris, it would be possible to present you with concrete and insurmountable proof–you would read testimonies from witnesses, perhaps even see the photographs from the expedition. I would explain the vast and wonderful contributions angelological thinkers have made over the centuries–St. Augustine, Aquinas, Milton, Dante–until our cause would appear clear and sparkling before you. I would lead you through the marble halls to a room where the historical records are preserved. We kept the most elaborate, intricately drawn schemas called angelologies that placed each and every angel exactly in its place. Such works give the universe order. The French mind is extremely tidy–Descartes’ work is evidence of this, not the  origin–and something about these systems was extremely soothing to me. I wonder if you, too, would find them so? (116).


If there was ever a book that brought in many of my favorite subjects, it is this one. Trussoni brings in:

Religion:
Rose of Viterbo is the Catholic saint which St. Rose Convent is named for. Depending on the source, there are different possibilities as to how she died. Here is one in particular: She began hearing voices at a young age and those voices told her to “speak the word.” The townspeople thought she was nuts, so they had her burned. Legend is that she stood in the middle of the flames and did not die, but conversed with the angels protecting her. She eventually died at the stake, but people paraded her body around afterwards, supposedly, she was unscathed.

The genealogy of Jesus and the idea that Jesus was not human at all, but an angel. This idea is known as angelmorphism. This is “interesting” because most Christians believe in the hypostatic union of Christ–he is not just human and not just divine, he is both. Controversial… 😉

History:
Kanpur Massacre occurred mid-1800’s. I by no means wish to downplay it, but basically what happened is the British attacked Kanpur, India, and killed two hundred children. The author does not leave any detail untouched, quite graphic in fact. Anyway, the Kanpur Massacre is connected to Angelology because the British were led by a Nephilistic being.

The French Revolution, the Hapsburgs, and the Tudors are also brought in as Nephilistic families.

Mythology
The Watchers are mythologized in the Greek legend of Prometheus, and various other mythologies are introduced. But I think I’ll leave this research up to you. There’s no fun in being told everything, and lots of fun in the investigation. 🙂

Geography:
Central to the conflict is the location of the Fallen. The Greeks call it Dyavolskoto Gurlo, or “the Devil’s Throat” or, in Old Bulgarian it is called Gyaurskoto Butlo, or “Infidel’s Prison.” It is a deep cave in the Rhodope Mountains, southeastern Europe (southern Bulgaria and Greece).

Philosophy:
Thomas Aquinas and St. Augustine’s views on the role of angels in the universe. Kind of Philosophical, but leaning more toward a Biblical reference is Enoch, who also makes an appearance. His 7 Heavens can be found here.

In the novel, angelic hierarchies are called the First Sphere, the Second Sphere, the Third Sphere, and the Heavenly Choir. These twelve hierarchies are divided in four orders, or spheres. I thought this was incredibly fascinating–there was no particular set of themes to be established, certain characters held the focus.

Readers, I was forced to do some math. I am here to say, I am an English major–you do the math. In any case, they are giving measurements called cubits for a male nephilim on pg. 228:
The cubit is a measurement of length used by early civilizations. It is the length of the forearm from the tip of the middle finger to the elbow.
Biblical system: 1 cubit=21.8 inches = 1.82 feet
Arms–2.01 cubits= 43.82 in.= 3.7 ft.
Legs–2.88 cubits= ? 62.78 in.= 5.2 ft.
Head circumference–1.85 cubits= 40.33 in.= 3.4 ft.
Chest circumference–2.81 cubits= 61.26 in.= 5.1 ft.
Feet–0.76 cubits= 16.57 in.= 1.4 ft.
Hands–0.68 cubits= 14.82 in.= 1.2 ft.
Scary. Keep in mind that the Nephilim are about 30% larger than the average human. Seven feet tall is their average height. Does that mean certain athletes can be nephilistic? That would suck. 😉

Danielle Trussoni created a music playlist that goes along with her novel. Click here to view the list because it is so worth viewing and listening to–I love it. And! This is a pretty cool site–oh so helpful. 🙂

Keith Donohue, author of The Stolen Child and Angels of Destruction states, Angelology lets loose the ancient fallen angels to the modern world with devastating results. Trussoni has written a holy thriller that will arrest your attention from the opening pages and not let go till its mysteries take wing.

To me, this novel was…terrifyingly amazing. I’m giving it a 5 out of 5… In my mind, 6 out of 5, but you know it is all good. 🙂

The last hundred pages or so are a complete rollercoaster. The ending is a cliffhanger. I sat there, speechless… so, to satisfy my need to know, I did a bit of research. Ladies and Gentlemen, there’s going to be a sequel titled, Angelopolis. I really want a deeper understanding of these topics… which means, it is time for Miss Nolaleigh to hit the books and articles to find out as much as I can. So… until next time…

❤ Nolaleigh

Living in Fast Forward & Attempting to Slow Way Down Wednesday, Dec 15 2010 

Hello Readers,

So, no book review today or anytime in the next day or so. I admit, I’ve been reading a couple books. I just could not get into them; I will not be continuing to read the Vampire Kisses series, I just can’t do it. I’m not saying they are terrible books, I just can’t get into them.  Like I’ve said in previous entries, that particular series is for younger teens. I wish you the best of luck. 🙂 Now that I have said this, let’s move on.

A couple things on the agenda and possibly worth mention:

Finals are over. I am so happy. Yet sad. Truthfully, people can tell me all the time to get a life–but more often than not, my life is  divided between the notebook paper and the glossy sheets in my textbooks. I’m not really sure how to cope with relaxation and nothing to do but sit. I know, I know. But I thrive under pressure–it just works for me. Anyway, Fall semester has ended and school is out for a month-ish. I don’t want to think about my spring semester yet, not yet, not yet. I don’t know who I’m trying to kid… I need the break as much as the next person. I’m tired in more than one way–knowing I’m too young to feel this damn old… I think I will pick up a new book.

Speaking of new books, guess what is happening?  Angelology by Danielle Trussoni has finally made its way to my library. I’ve been waiting since May–that takes dedication people! So… during Christmas break, methinks I will read a couple good books. Unfortuntely for you… or maybe just me, there won’t be any new posts until the new year. Or at least I don’t think there will be. Being in a place with no internet has its perks. Actually, quick update, not only is Trussoni’s novel in, but so is

Just A Little Bit Wednesday, Oct 20 2010 

Hello Readers!

 I thought I might let you in on what has been going on with my 2010 Reading List and a little bit about me… just a little bit. Here goes…

I have removed a certain number of the titles I had on the list. For a couple of reasons I might add–this way nobody can spit thorns in my direction. There were just too many titles to get through. It was a wonderful thought–read over 150 books in a year or less. Granted, I am still reading most of them–I just took away about 50 titles, maybe a couple more. I had too much of a topic that I love reading about in small doses, namely European royalty. Also, I started reading Nefertiti, but I have to return it–have to read other books, so I’ll be returning to Egypt one day. 🙂 In any case, that is what’s going on there.

New news with me–I am in the process of making a 2011 Reading List. It is very short and reasonable. The books for 2011 seem to have a theme so that should be fun to play with and see where it takes me. I would like it if I could finish it by the end of 2011, that is how short it is. I am giving my 2010 list a little over a year to be done, however, starting Summer 2011, I’ll probably be mixing up the lists just a bit. I will release the 2011 list in the new year. However, I suppose if you want a sneak peek, you could always ask–ya know? 😉

My original list can be found here, 2010 Reading List. My revised list goes as follows:

Anything that is crossed out, I have finished reading and reviewed by October 19, 2010.
** Indicates that it is currently on hold and what is to come within the next month

Singles
Island Beneath the Sea by Isabel Allende
Girl in Translation by Jean Kwok
God Is Not One: The Eight Rival Religions That Run the World and Why Their Differences Matter by Stephen R. Prothero
The Bride Collector by Ted Dekker
The Hand that First Held Mine by Maggie O’Farrell
Imperfect Birds by Anne Lamott
Angelology by Danielle Trussoni
Nefertiti by Michelle Moran
The Heretic Queen by Michelle Moran
Cleopatra’s Daughter by Michelle Moran
Madame Tussaud by Michelle Moran

Series
Millenium Trilogy by Stieg Larsson
                The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
                The Girl Who Played with Fire
                The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest
Eve Duncan Saga by Iris Johansen
                The Face of Deception
                The Killing Game
                The Search
                Body of Lies
                Blind Alley
                Countdown
                Stalemate
                Quicksand
                Blood Game
                Eight Days to Live
Blue Bloods Series by Melissa de la Cruz
                Blue Bloods
                Masquerade
                Revelations
                The Van Alen Legacy
                Misguided Angel
Mercy Thompson Series by Patricia Briggs
                Moon Called
                Blood Bound
                Iron Kissed
                Bone Crossed
                Silver Borne
                River Marked
Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter Series
 by Laurell K. Hamilton
                Guilty Pleasures
                **The Laughing Corpse
                Circus of the Damned
                The Lunatic Cafe
                Bloody Bones
                The Killing Dance
                Burnt Offerings
                Blue Moon
                Obsidian Butterfly
                Narcissus in Chains
                Cerulean Sins
                Incubus Dreams
                Micah
                Danse Macabre
                The Harlequin
                Blood Noir
                Skin Trade
                Flirt
                Bullet
Vampire Academy Series by Richelle Mead
                Vampire Academy
                Frostbite
                **Shadow Kiss
                Blood Promise
                Spirit Bound
                Last Sacrifice
Vampire Kisses Series by Ellen Schreiber
                Vampire Kisses
                **Kissing Coffins
                **Vampireville
                Dance with a Vampire
                The Coffin Club
                Royal Blood
                Love Bites

Happy Reading!

2010 Reading List Wednesday, May 19 2010 

So most people are saying ambitious, I’m saying this looks like fun. I’ve already begun to read some of these, and I’m sure the list will grow–I won’t be reading in any particular order–let’s go!

Single
Island Beneath the Sea by Isabel Allende
Girl in Translation by Jean Kwok
God Is Not One: The Eight Rival Religions That Run the World and Why Their Differences Matter by Stephen R. Prothero
Every Last One by Anna Quindlen
The Bride Collector by Ted Dekker
The Hand that First Held Mine by Maggie O’Farrell
Imperfect Birds by Anne Lamott
The Vampire and the Virgin by Kerrelyn Sparks
Angelology by Danielle Trussoni
The Amber Room by Steve Berry
The Romanov Prophecy by Steve Berry
Nefertiti by Michelle Moran
The Heretic Queen by Michelle Moran
Cleopatra’s Daughter by Michelle Moran
Madame Tussaud by Michelle Moran
The Virgin Queen’s Daughter by Ella March Chase
The Devil’s Queen by Jeanne Kalogridis
The Borgia Bride by Jeanne Kalogridis
The Queen’s Mistake by Diane Haeger
Mary Boleyn by Josephine Wilkinson
Catherine Howard by Lacey Baldwin Smith
Margaret Pole by Hazel Pierce
Lady Jane Grey by E.W. Ives
The Mistresses of Henry VIII by Kelly Hart
The Tudor Queens of England by David Loades
Jane Seymour by Elizabeth Norton
Six Wives by David Starkey
The Virgin’s Daughters by Jeane Westin

Series
Millenium Trilogy Series by Stieg Larsson (3)
Eve Duncan Series by Iris Johansen (9+)
Special Agent Pendergast Series by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child (10+)
Alex Delaware Series by Jonathan Kellerman (22+)
Blue Bloods Series by Melissa de la Cruz (4)
Mercy Thompson Series by Patricia Briggs (5+)
Midnight Breed Series by Lara Adrian (7+)
Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter Series by Laurell K. Hamilton (17+)

I am currently reading David Starkey’s Six Wives. The collective stories of the wives of Henry Tudor VIII–Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr.

Do you have any favorites?